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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Recruitment & Retention of African-American Students in Gifted Education Programs found in the catalog.

The Recruitment & Retention of African-American Students in Gifted Education Programs

Implications & Recommendations

  • 18 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Diane Pub Co .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Education

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPlastic comb
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11100418M
    ISBN 100788143336
    ISBN 109780788143335

    EQUITABLE ACCESS FOR UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS IN GIFTED EDUCATION African American students in her study were not referred for screening even though they had test scores EQUITABLE ACCESS FOR UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS IN GIFTED EDUCATION The, File Size: 1MB. improving the recruitment and retention of African American students in gifted education. Journal of Negro Education, 80(3), Hughes, C. Page, A., & Ford, D.Y. (). Cultural dynamics in an economically challenged, multiethnic middle school: Student perceptions. Journal of At-Risk Issues, 16(1), Ford, D.Y. (). Closing the File Size: 1MB.

    Yet, in the report National Excellence, A Case for Developing America’s Talent (11), attention is called to a quiet crisis in the education of gifted students, as there is a disparity in the proportion of students identified and served in gifted programs among talented children from economically disadvantaged homes and/or from culturally or. The recruitment and retention of African American students in gifted education programs: Implication and recommendations (RBDM). Storrs: University of Connecticut, The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented.

    The Recruitment and Retention of African American Students in Gifted Education Programs: Implications and Recommendations. (RBDM ). Connecticut: University of Connecticut, The National Research Center for the Gifted and Talented, In a study based on data from the Elementary and Secondary School Civil Rights Survey, for example, education researcher Donna Y. Ford at Vanderbilt University and her colleagues found that African American students are underrepresented in gifted programs by about 51 percent and Hispanic students by about 42 percent, relative to their.


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The Recruitment & Retention of African-American Students in Gifted Education Programs Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Recruitment and Retention of African American Students in Gifted Education Programs: Implications and Recommendations Donna Y. Ford. Guideline. A culture of assessment rather than a culture of testing promises to capture the strengths of gifted African American students.

There is no “one size fits all” intelligence or achievement test. This report describes barriers to the successful recruitment and retention of African American students in gifted education programs and services, and offers recommendations for ensuring successful recruitment and retention of this population.

Barriers to recruitment identified include: inadequate identification practices, too little attention given to non-intellectual barriers to achievement Cited by: 1. Recruitment is an important component for increasing the number of African American students in gifted education, but retention is equally important.

Using multiple frameworks, this article examines the notion of retention and its many challenges and offers recommendations for improving the retention of African American students in gifted Cited by: The Recruitment and Retention of African American Students in Gifted Education Programs: Implications and Recommendations Donna Y.

Ford The University of Virginia Charlottesville, Virginia EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Introduction A primary purpose of gifted education is File Size: KB. The under-representation of minority students in gifted education: Problems and promises in recruitment and retention.

The Journal of Special Education, 32 (1), 4– CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: The Underrepresentation of Minority Students in Gifted Education: Problems and Promises in Recruitment and Retention Article (PDF Available) in The Journal of Author: Donna Y. Ford.

The authors examine factors hindering the recruitment and retention of CLD students in gifted education, attending in particular to definitions and theories, testing, and referral issues, and. Minority Recruitment and Retention Among Gifted Students: /ch Consistent with the national goal implemented by our current government, Auburn University is also working to recruit and retain underrepresented minoritiesAuthor: Chandra A.

Stallworth, Ken D. Thomas. parents and teachers’ perspectives on the schooling experiences of African American students in an urban gifted program. More specifically, the research examined the social, emotional, and academic challenges that contribute to the underrepresentation of African American students in gifted and talented programs.

The study involved one urban File Size: 1MB. As an advocate for underrepresented gifted students, Gifted & Advanced Black Students in School is a must have in my professional library. This anthology provides the reader with a much needed historical context for the underrepresentation of Black students in gifted programs -and provides the framework from which we can move forward.5/5(2).

Universal screening is one solution to increasing the number of African American students in gifted programs. InBroward County, Florida, adopted universal screening and the number of African American students in gifted programs increased by 80 percent.

Other remedies, recommended by Grissom and Redding, include increasing diversity among. Being gifted and talented and also African American makes children double minorities, and the issues they face can be different from those faced by most other gifted book provides helpful insights and guidelines for the parenting and education of Black gifted addition to the challenges that are frequently experienced by many gifted children, such as underachievement /5(15).

Recruitment and Retention of African American Students in Gifted Education Donna Y. Ford James L. Moore Ш Michelle Trotman Scott Vanderbilt University The Ohio State University University of West Georgia An issue of much concern, and under much scrutiny and debate, is the persistent and extensive under-representation of African American.

Ford, D. The recruitment and retention of African-American students in gifted programs. Storrs, CT: University of Connecticut, National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented. Ford, D. Reversing underachievement among gifted Black students: Promising practices and programs.

New York: Teachers College Press. Young, Gifted, and Black is a unique joint effort by three leading African-American scholars to radically reframe the debates swirling around the achievement of African-American students in school.

In three separate but allied essays, Theresa Perry, Claude Steele, and Asa Hilliard place students' social identity as African-Americans at the very center of the discussion.4/5. The paradoxical reality that gifted students can and do underachieve seems impossible to many educators and families.

Thus, such students, especially gifted Black students who underachieve, are misunderstood and poorly served, This book was written specifically for this population so that they are recruited and retained in gifted education. My major premise: A mind is a terrible thing to waste.

The Recruitment & Retention of African-American Students in Gifted Education Programs: Implications & Recommendations by Donna Y. Ford avg rating — 0 ratings. Retaining African American Students in Gifted Education James L.

Moore III, Donna Y. Ford, and H. Richard Milner CHAPTER 24 Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students in Gifted Education: Recruitment and Retention Issues Donna Y.

Ford, Tarek C. Grantham, and Gilman W. Whiting SECTION VII The Future of Gifted Education for Black Students. Black students are percent of the total student population in the United States, yet only percent of the students in gifted programming are black, according to the U.S.

Department of. Chapter 23 Recruitment Is Not Enough: Retaining African American Students in Gifted Education James L. Moore III Donna Y. Ford H. Richard Milner Chapter 24 Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students in Gifted Education: Recruitment and Retention Issues Donna Y.

Ford Tarek C. Grantham Gilman W. Whiting Pages:. Spread the loveCollege enrollment is critical to the continued success of higher education. Recruitment and retention strategies take center stage when universities consider how to attract and keep the best students at their campuses, and every strategy comes down to one simple concept: build relationships through recruitment and retention.

Recruitment The first step in increasing college.the successful recruitment and retention of African American graduate students, asserting that African American graduate students provide African American faculty with a likely source of research assistance, af-firm the work of African American faculty, and enable African American faculty to realize the satisfaction associated with mentoring.Ford is “like the Harriet Tubman in Black gifted education,” says Dr.

James L. Moore III, Ohio State University’s vice provost for diversity and inclusion, chief diversity officer and executive director of the Todd Anthony Bell National Resource Center on the African-American Male.